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Posts tagged "custody"

Failure to pay child support may lead to incarceration

Massachusetts parents who are divorcing may wonder what will happen when the noncustodial parent who is ordered to pay child support does not do so. While there are methods of enforcing child support payments, parents who are genuinely unable to meet their obligations could find themselves trapped in a cycle of poverty and incarceration.

A look at the many forms that domestic violence can take

Massachusetts residents with an interest in family law issues may wish to learn some information about what domestic violence is and what effect it can have. Due to the seriousness of these matters, this information may help spouses and partners to recognize the issue before it goes too far.

Census finds moms less likely to pay child support than dads

Massachusetts parents may be surprised that 'deadbeat moms," or those who fail to pay child support to the custodial parent, aren't that rare. The 2011 U.S. Census reports that less than 20 percent of fathers had custody of their children, with only a quarter of these dads having child support agreements in place. In comparison, 50 percent of custodial mothers had support agreements.

Pets are becoming major issue in divorce cases

Property division, financial support and child custody are all common issues that arise during Massachusetts divorce proceedings. However, pet custody and visitation is quickly becoming a frequent issue as well. According to The Humane Society of the United States, there are more than 179 million dogs and cats living in American homes as pets. Many pet owners have formed strong bonds with these pets and view them as another member of the family. That can cause intense disputes during divorce.

Changing a child's last name after a divorce

After going through a divorce in Massachusetts, a mother may wish to have her child's last name changed to her maiden name. As long as the child's father is still fulfilling his parental duties, many courts will not allow a child's last name to be changed after a divorce. However, there are some circumstances where a court will fulfill the mother's request for her child's last name to be changed.

How is paternity established in Massachusetts?

In the state of Massachusetts, establishing paternity is an important process when a child is born out of wedlock. Paternity must be officially established and recorded before a court can decide on issues like child support payments, custody and visitation. Fortunately, there is a well-defined process in the state for establishing paternity. The child's parents simply need to file the appropriate paperwork with either the clerk in the city where the child was born or the registrar of vital records.

Domestic violence incident spurs state lawmakers into action

Readers may recall a violent domestic abuse allegation that ended in tragedy. The son of Red Sox broadcaster Jerry Remy was accused of stabbing to death a woman in Waltham, Massachusetts. Some commentators may have faulted authorities for not taking more precautions, as the tragedy happened the very next day after the man had been released from custody -- on assault charges against the same woman.

Family law helps preserve parental, child rights during adoption

In Massachusetts, state law provides certain parental rights to birth parents. Although there are exceptions, such as in the case of a parent that has been found legally unfit by a family law court, it is generally presumed that a parent has a right to be involved in his or her child’s life. For that reason, consent is generally required from a birth parent before a child may be placed up for adoption.

Considering a prenuptial agreement in a second marriage


Married couples in Massachusetts understand that the divorce process requires much decision-making. Even after dissolution, the need to make major choices does not cease. The end of a marriage often means still dealing with post-divorce issues. Whether it is child custody disputes, alimony payments or just simply moving on with life, various family law issues can persist long after a divorce is finalized. This is often true for those going through a second or third marriage.

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