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The concept of reasonable visitation

Figuring out child custodial issues can be a difficult endeavor, but even once they are resolved, further complications can arise when it comes to visitation by the noncustodial parent. In some cases, a judge will order a fixed visitation schedule for the noncustodial parent, but when two parents can manage to work together, they may agree on "reasonable visitation". Massachusetts parents who agree to this see several benefits, but this type of arrangement isn't right in every situation.

For a reasonable visitation agreement to work properly, both parents must be able to work together. It is the parent with legal custody who will have the final say on a visitation schedule that is reasonable, but if they use this as a method to punish the other parent, it's impossible for the arrangement to work out. If two parents cannot decide upon a fair visitation schedule or one of them isn't abiding by the set schedule, a judge may step in and order a fixed schedule to ensure fairness on all sides.

In the end, a reasonable visitation schedule is beneficial for all those involved. Not only does it take a burden off of the court systems, but it also allows parents to be more flexible with their time since they can work visitation around their own schedules. On top of this, the child will be in a much more friendly environment when their parents are managing to work together for the young one's benefit.

Child custody and visitation issues can quickly become heated between two parents, but their willingness to work together can make for a much more amenable environment. This arrangement, however, will not work for every former couple. In these instances, it's imperative to show a judge exactly why a certain visitation schedule is in the best interest of a child.

Source: Findlaw, "The judge mentioned "reasonable visitation," what does that mean? ", December 24, 2014

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